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Wildfire Madness

Flames+destroy+homes+and+vehicles+as+the+fire+tears+through+Paradise%2C+California+on+November+8%2C+2018.
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Wildfire Madness

Flames destroy homes and vehicles as the fire tears through Paradise, California on November 8, 2018.

Flames destroy homes and vehicles as the fire tears through Paradise, California on November 8, 2018.

Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

Flames destroy homes and vehicles as the fire tears through Paradise, California on November 8, 2018.

Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

Flames destroy homes and vehicles as the fire tears through Paradise, California on November 8, 2018.

Jessica Bodmer, Staff Writer

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Last Thursday, history sparked in California with the deadliest wildfire the state has ever seen, called the Camp Fire. Do not be fooled by the name; the cause of the fire is still a mystery.

Prior to last week, the deadliest forest fire—Griffith Park Blaze—had killed 29 people in 1933. However, in Northern California, at least 42 residents that we know of have perished from the enormous Camp Fire. It has burned 125,000 acres, with only 30% of the destruction contained thus far.

Southern California has not escaped the catastrophe either. Even though it is not the largest wildfire in state history, Woolsey Fire is wreaking havoc. The wildfire burned 96, 314 acres of land and destroyed 435 buildings.

Camp Fire and Woolsey Fire together have affected 6,500 homes, leaving families devastated. More than 50,000 people have fled in order to stay safe from the engulfing flames and the unhealthy air from the smoke. People are doing anything they can to help California; planes are scooping water from the ocean and dumping it on the fires to control the flames from spreading. In addition, 5,000 brave firefighters have been fighting to contain the fires and help people suffering from this tragedy.

Even though the fires are states away, they still affect people close to home. Junior Anna Fernandez has family who live in Southern California, and they have been warned that they should pack their car and be prepared to evacuate their home if necessary.

“My aunt was nervous that if she left the house she would come back and it would not be there,” said Fernandez.

Thankfully, Fernandez’s aunt’s house is near one of the sites that helps people who have been affected by the wildfires. This gave her a sense of protection, because if a site was near her home, then the fires are most likely not going to reach the house.

However, thousands of other families are fearful for their lives and their homes, and many residents have suffered loss already.

Make sure to keep everyone who has been affected by the wildfires and their families in your prayers.

https://www.npr.org/2018/11/13/667315613/californias-camp-fire-becomes-the-deadliest-in-state-history

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About the Writer
Jessica Bodmer, Staff Writer

Jessica Bodmer is a junior at St. Dominic High School. She is involved in soccer, cross country, CRU, Pro Life, AD Club, and Outreach. Outside of school...

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Wildfire Madness